LSD Gets Another Look As Alcoholism Treatment

A rigorous analysis of data from studies conducted decades ago suggest that one dose of the hallucinogenic drug could help people stop drinking. It’s the latest work to call for further research on therapeutic use of hallucinogens.

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Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

Though the immediate nuclear crisis in Japan has passed, the process of securing and stabilizing the radioactive materials from the melted-down reactors will be a long, expensive slog. Recovery workers will also need to decontaminate the area surrounding the plant.

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A Way To Save The Rhino, Just Not Its Horn

Rhino poaching is on the rise. The animal’s horn is believed to have medicinal properties, and some say legalizing the trade could help squelch the black market. One controversial way to reduce poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale.

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Diving Back To The Bottom Of The Mariana Trench

Robert Siegel talks to retired Navy Captain Don Walsh about the attempt by movie director James Cameron to take a submersible capsule to the bottom of the Mariana Trench — the deepest spot on Earth. Walsh says the National Geographic and James Cameron expedition will be a combination of science and adventure, because Cameron is a storyteller and dedicated amateur explorer. Walsh made a 1960 dive to the same trench.

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Planet Or Not, Pluto’s Getting A Visitor

The New Horizons Mission blasted off toward Pluto in 2006; it’s on course to arrive in Pluto’s neighborhood in 2015. Mission leader Alan Stern discusses the journey of the spacecraft, and why he thinks Pluto is still a planet. Plus, the mission to get Pluto on a commemorative stamp.

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Studying Locomotion With Rat Treadmills, Wind Tunnels

Between the resident emu and the newborn goats, Harvard’s Concord Field Station, located in Bedford, Mass., has a menagerie feel. The lab researches how different animals move–which requires lots of animals, and gadgets to facilitate and document their motion.

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Dark Matter Just Got More Mysterious

Reporting in the Astrophysical Journal, scientists write of a massive collision between two galaxy clusters. By studying the cosmic remnants of that smashup, they say leftover dark matter isn’t behaving as current theory predicts. Astrophysicist Andisheh Mahdavi discusses this dark matter mystery.

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A Workout Can Change Your DNA

Reporting in Cell Metabolism, researchers write that when people who lead relatively sedentary lives worked out the DNA in their muscle fibers changed almost immediately. Scientists also found caffeine had the same effect on isolated rodent muscles. Study co-author Juleen Zierath discusses the DNA modifications.

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Can An Early Spring Confuse Nature’s Clock?

It’s been an unusually warm winter in some parts of the country, with springtime temperatures and very little snow. How is nature responding? Purdue entomologist Tom Turpin and horticulturalist Kristin Schleiter of the New York Botanical Garden discuss how an early spring affects flower buds, beetles and bees.

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How To Get More For Your Bite

When you crunch into a potato chip or take a spoonful of chocolate mousse what you experience is more than just the taste of the food. In her book Taste What You’re Missing, Barb Stuckey discusses why truly experiencing food involves all five senses and offers tips on how to get more enjoyment from your next meal.

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Gorilla Genome Sheds Light On Human Evolution

Reporting in Nature, researchers write they have deciphered the genetic code of the gorilla, the last of the great apes to have its genome sequenced. Study co-author Aylwyn Scally discusses what the data reveal about the evolution of humans and other apes.

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Trauma, Not Radiation, Is Key Concern In Japan

Experts say health effects from the radiation released by last year’s nuclear disaster will be minimal. But the lasting psychological trauma from the tsunami, including the loss of life and livelihoods, will be an ongoing struggle.

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Senate Blocks Effort To Speed Pipeline Approval

The 56-42 vote came after President Obama called Democratic senators to lobby them to oppose the 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry tar sands oil from western Canada. Republicans wanted to sidestep Obama’s rejection of the pipeline and allow the project to go forward.

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Unprecedented Map Pieces Together Titanic’s Wreck

An expedition team used sonar imaging and more than 100,000 photos taken from underwater robots to create the map, which shows where hundreds of objects and pieces of the presumed-unsinkable vessel landed after striking an iceberg, killing more than 1,500 people.

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Solar Storm Goes Easy On Earth — But More Are Sure To Come, NASA Says

The huge solar storm that NASA detected hurtling toward Earth hit our planet at 5:42 a.m. ET Thursday. So far, there have been no reports of major power or communications disruptions. But it’s not the last you’ll hear about solar storms; the sun’s activity won’t peak until 2013.

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Sun Sends Solar Flares Speeding Toward Earth; Will Hit Thursday [VIDEO]

The sun ejected two huge solar flares Tuesday, and NASA says that we here on Earth will likely be affected somewhat by the magnetic fields and ionized gas that are now shooting toward the planet. But the phenomena might also bring aurora light shows to residents of the northern United States

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